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Working in Cambodia

If you want to work in Cambodia, be aware of the following facts:

  • Cambodia is a country of low income. It means that the minimum wage is $150 per month. Foreigners with a professional background could get between $500 and $1,000.
  • You must get the Business Visa – now you can apply for it online or upon arrival… a visa for 6 to 12 months. Some westerners look down on Cambodian authorities and stay in the country without a legal permit, thinking that they are smarter… most of these smart guys have been deported as fast as they think. Get your proper permissions on time.
  • Cambodia needs a lot of skilfull personnel for its development. There is a big young population but the skill formation remains low. It gives a lot of opportunities for professional foreigners – for now…. until the Cambodian youth get the point and take those places.

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Cambodian perception 2015

  • Cambodians think that there are too many migrants, Muslims and Christians in the country and that 33 % of Cambodians are working abroad. These wrong perceptions can come from lack of information or bias. 

“Perceptions are not reality” is the slogan of the 2015 survey by Ipsos MORI’s on Perils of Perception in 33 countries of the six continents, excluding Cambodia. The study asked questions such as obesity, non-religious, immigration, 25-34 living with parents, average age, population aged under 14, female politicians, female employment, rural living and internet access and built a table – the index of ignorance – from the least to the most accurate countries in their perception over those realities. Ipsos MORI chose the two Asian giants, India and China for the research, discovering that India is the second least accurate country after Mexico, and China got a good place: 25 out of 28, overcome by Poland, Ireland and South Korea.

Cambodian men

Cambodia is estimated to be one of the Asian countries with the youngest population of the continent for the rest of the century.

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Lidia Linde, a hero in child protection

Lidia Linde in Heros

I invite you to read this profile of Lidia Linde Ginesta (Ma Lidia), portrayed by Unsung Heroes Compassion. Just in the middle of many denounces of fake orphanages in Cambodia that are only facades for hidden business using poor children, we need to look up real and transparent experiences and, who more than real and transparent than Lidia. If someone has any doubt of who is she, just walk into her Siem Reap office and check any possible book, contact any of her donors and know her story, far from fiction and full of heroicity.  Read More…

Phnom Penh’s AEON Mall for a dreamer city

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Aeon Mall at the river side on July 9, 2014. Photo A. Rodas.

I visited AEON Mall today in Phnom Penh. Fortunately there was not too much rain in the city, so it was possible to move in my favorite urban transport: tuk-tuk (still I have to check the urban bus.) Entering the 205 million dollars mall, I remembered October 1999 when I arrived for the first time to Phnom Penh from Bangkok and then I could made a lot comparisons between two of the Southeast Asian capitals. Phnom Penh was a dusty town full of  thieves, beggars, electricity service was limited, Internet was dominated by a single poor service company, unpaved roads, odors from a nonexistent sewage system… Then, before this huge mall between Diamond Island (Koh Pich) and Sothearos Boulevard, one friend pointed to it and said “A big mall for a poor country.” In fact it is, but I don’t share the same intention of the announcement. It is similar to the comment of one visitor to my social communication section: “But these boys don’t see coming from poverty… they have laptops!” Sure, they have, because I have been promoting that they give value to education even in the middle of their poverty to be able to break their poverty circle.  Read More…

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