Hot Cambodia, a social view of the Tropics

The current intention to explain why tropical countries are poorer than those countries in the temperate zone could touch a big variety of proposals, some of them of arguable position. For example, Jeffrey D. Sachs exposes that tropical regions have low agricultural productivity and the burden of tropical diseases:

“As Sachs sees it, tropical regions face two related major ecological handicaps: low agricultural productivity and a high burden of disease. Tropical soils are typically depleted by the effects of heavy rainfall, for example, and tropical crops are beset by pests and parasites that thrive in hot climates without winter frosts. Similarly, warm climates favor the transmission of many tropical diseases that are borne by insects and bacteria.” (Bloomberg, 2001)

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Internet Providers without Customer Service

  • The Cambodian Internet Providers lack a real sense for Customer Service.
  • You could be disconnected for days and your calls for an urgent attention is unheard. They are always “busy” and the company would send somebody when it wants, not when you need. 

Although the technological development of Internet in Cambodia, the business still dominated by incompetence and lack of customer service. You can change your Internet Provider as many times as you want, but at the end you will feel the same disappointment when something goes wrong and you have to call to the “Customer Service” to listen the same words: “Yes, sir, we are going to attend you” but you don’t know when; “we are now too much busy, sorry, sir” even if you have an Internet Cafe and your own customers will go away.

Do you recommend a Cambodian Internet Provider? Let your experience be known to others, to choose the best one and to crush mediocre companies with a lack of sense for customer service. Let your comment in this page or rate the companies in our poll.

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First Large Grid Connected Solar Energy in Cambodia

  • 386 solar panels on 2 roofs of Don Bosco Technical School in Sihanoukville, the first large grid connected solar energy in Cambodia.
  • It costs 130,000 Euros mainly financed by Finland. 
  • Electricity of Cambodia accepted that surplus should enter the national grid, becoming the first experience of that kind in the country.

Solar energy is becoming a good alternative for a country like Cambodia and its growing development. Cambodia has to important most of his power from neighbouring countries like Thailand and Vietnam. Producing its own energy would be a key for its own development. Solar energy is not only a good solution but it goes along with the growing needs for a friendly environment system.


Aspect of the Solar Plant over the Social Communication Section Building of the Don Bosco Technical School in Sihanoukville Province. The first grid connected solar plant of Cambodia.

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Cambodia is on the right track, said German Secretary of State on visit


German Secretary of State, Friedrich Kitschelt visits Cambodia.

The German Secretary of State in the Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ), Friedrich Kitschelt, ended a trip to Asia stating that “Cambodia and Vietnam are on the right track.”

“Since the end of the regime of terror of the Khmer Rouge, Cambodia has achieved considerable success. Yet part of the country with a per capita income of about 1 thousand US dollars per year and a poverty rate of 20 percent is still among the less developed countries. The German Development Cooperation has targeted support for rural development, for example through the improvement of road networks and the health system, the most pressing problems of the Cambodian population,” said Kitschelt.

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The Westernizers

The concept of Westernization is not so simple like to say “it refers to the conversion to or adoption of Western traditions and customs.” There are many perspectives of what is the West as a cultural archetype in which the main one is to assume social, economic and political ideas of typically associated wealthy countries like North America and Western Europe. In Europe, Westernization is mostly to follow the European models of society and it has been like this since the 15th century and the beginning of a colonial era that was to be for five centuries. At the original base of what defines the West, we find the Greek and Roman civilizations, their philosophy and their ways of thinking. Then the contribution of the Judeo-Christian religions would settle the profile of what was to be the West culture. The Discovery of the Americas, the French and Industrial revolutions and the European colonialism would close down the concept. Continue reading

The Cambodian train: too slow for a speed world


The Cambodian bamboo  train is an attraction, but it’s not what we expect.

The promises for a renovated Cambodian train as it was the dream during the French colonial period and after the independence, are just promises without any fulfillment. Probably ASEAN will help us in its realization, but today we still with a very slow train without a meaningful impact in the national life and its development. Probably the bamboo train in Battambang could be attractive for tourists as an aboriginal way to adapt to conditions, but it is also the proof that we really need a train.  Continue reading

Phnom Penh’s AEON Mall for a dreamer city


Aeon Mall at the river side on July 9, 2014. Photo A. Rodas.

I visited AEON Mall today in Phnom Penh. Fortunately there was not too much rain in the city, so it was possible to move in my favorite urban transport: tuk-tuk (still I have to check the urban bus.) Entering the 205 million dollars mall, I remembered October 1999 when I arrived for the first time to Phnom Penh from Bangkok and then I could made a lot comparisons between two of the Southeast Asian capitals. Phnom Penh was a dusty town full of  thieves, beggars, electricity service was limited, Internet was dominated by a single poor service company, unpaved roads, odors from a nonexistent sewage system… Then, before this huge mall between Diamond Island (Koh Pich) and Sothearos Boulevard, one friend pointed to it and said “A big mall for a poor country.” In fact it is, but I don’t share the same intention of the announcement. It is similar to the comment of one visitor to my social communication section: “But these boys don’t see coming from poverty… they have laptops!” Sure, they have, because I have been promoting that they give value to education even in the middle of their poverty to be able to break their poverty circle.  Continue reading