Countries with the Harshest Drug Laws in the World

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In Cambodia, you can be sentenced to many years in prison or even life in prison for possessing drugs. Unlike many other South Asian countries, Cambodia does not mandate the death penalty for drug trafficking.

In countries like Dubai, just bringing in certain prescription medication  can result in you being put in prison. In many countries, drug laws are still taken incredibly seriously and many will still sentence you to death for trafficking or dealing in them. In fact, Cambodia is one of the only South Asian countries which doesn’t execute for drug offences.

If you want to read more about the drug laws in Asian, South American and Middle Eastern countries, this guide describes which ones  still use the death penalty and which ones will hand out a lengthy prison sentence.

By Claire Harding.

Show me your city, an intercultural experience

show me your city logoWhat is the common thing between Colombian and Cambodian young people? “Show me your city“, an intercultural experience. In 2013 I agreed with two teachers of the Pontifical Bolivariana University of Medellín, Maribel Rodríguez and Ariel Acevedo, to make an academic experience between their students of graphic design and my students of social communication of Don Bosco Sihanoukville and Kep. The idea was that the students meet through a Facebook page and agree over the production of a short video per groups (5 to 10 minutes). In the story they have to show their culture, traditions and environment. Communication is of course an issue, but we wanted to demonstrate the effects of a global youth culture.  Continue reading

The World Bank Report

You can get the World Bank report in this link. It is an extensive and very accurate research on East Asia. There are some facts about Cambodia we need to follow such as the lack of skilful workforce that would make the Cambodian economy vulnerable. But there are other facts to point out as well. Here I make a list of those facts described by the report in regard to Cambodia.

  1. Cambodia remains with a significant problem in malnutrition of children together with Papua New Guinea and Timor-Leste.
  2. We are among the faster labor productivity growings in the planet.
  3. Most Cambodians continue to work in the informal sector (primary sector) and not in wage and salaried employment. It is also because Cambodia continues to be a rather agricultural society.
  4. Cambodia rank poorly with regard to friendly investment climate (place 137 in the world.)
  5. In Cambodia training program relied more in centralized planning and government supply than by market demand.
  6. Cambodia is near the worst performance Micronesia limit in “ease of doing business” rank in East Asia.
  7. Cambodia is considered an agrarian society with near 80% of its population living in rural areas. It means we need to raise the productivity of agriculture in order to free labor and human capital to work in rural off-farms enterprises and eventually to migrate to town and cities.

Cambodia since 1999, a video documentary

I share this video documentary by Teleantioquia about Cambodia. It is in Spanish, but you can understand most of the story. We are doubling it in Khmer and English… coming soon. A good resume of what is Cambodia, its history, Siem Reap, Phnom Penh, Kampot, Kep and Sihanoukville and how I see Cambodia since 1999.

Albeiro Rodas in Cambodia – Part 1, Teleantioquia, 2014.

Albeiro Rodas in Cambodia – Part 2, Teleantioquia, 2014.

Albeiro Rodas in Cambodia – Part 3, Teleantioquia, 2014.

Albeiro Rodas in Cambodia – Part 4, Teleantioquia, 2014.

How I see Cambodia by Teleantioquia

On October 12, 1999 I arrived to the Phnom Penh International Airport at 9 AM. Between October 2001 and August 2005 I studied theology in Jerusalem, a time I used to improve my Khmer reading and writing, as well as the Cambodian history. Teleantioquia, the Colombian television channel from Medellín, dedicated this documentary about how I see Cambodia. I invite you to watch it this coming Monday at 10:30 AM, Cambodian time (3:30 AM UTC/GMT) with repetition on the following Saturday at 9:30 AM in http://www.teleantioquia.co/. Even if it is in Spanish, you will understand many images and meanings on this beautiful work dedicated to my children and youth of Cambodia.

Risks of rising the minimum wage?

Sihanoukville. 8 days after the crackdown on garment factory workers and opposition rallies in Phnom Penh, Cambodia seems normal this weekend. The national television continues its regular programs showing Thai and Korean soft operas, karaoke videos and news about curious things in the West like the polar freezing in US or “national news” like the January 7′s Liberation Day Anniversary to remember when Pol Pot and his cronies were defeated and Cambodia got a new birth. The crackdown is mentioned in the television programs of course, such as to announce that factories are  filling cases in court against trade unions for “incitement to strike, damage to property and assets”, according to Ken Loo, secretary-general of the Garment Manufacturers Association in Cambodia… Continue reading at Asian Correspondent…

Why Cambodians migrate to Thailand

Phnom Penh. CARAM Cambodia, USAID and WINROCK International celebrated a forum directed to the private sector at the Cambodiana Hotel on Friday with about 50 participants from government, private sector, NGOs, migrant workers’ representatives and stakeholders. Sam Somuny, the CARAM’s project officer said that the forum was promoted by the official National Employment Agency of the Ministry of Labor and his NGO. The event was also attended by ten workers that were deported from Thailand for illegal employment in that country.  Continue reading