Cambodia this Monsoon

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The Monsoon is actually a good time to visit Cambodia. Raining is a blessing in a country where 80% of its population lives in rural areas and depends on rice fields. Flooding is not such a disaster, though it causes its troubles, especially in provinces lie Kratie and Kompung Cham. Here some photos from ZenTrips.net, a tourist agency specialized in Spanish speaking travelers to Cambodia.

Motorcrossing for Cambodian helmets in Sihanoukville

Here is our first video on the ISeeCambodia’s campaign for helmets and safety on the national roads. The proposal is to show the situation and to move the Cambodian youth to increase their own worry to spread the message. Send your video clips’ links in Youtube and we can publish in this blog. You can entitle your video as “Motorcrossing for Cambodian helmets” and show the situation in a short video wherever you are.

The Sihanokville symbol

Tao Pi Sihanoukville July 2014 by Leito Rango

The Tao Pi Monument in July 2014. Photo by Chan Bora.

Aspect of the renovated Tao Pi Monument in Sihanoukville (Two Lions Square.) The public administration includes new lights around the roundabout, redesigned the gardens – well… practically removed the gardens and put tiles – and gave more visibility to this monument that represents Sihanoukville. They mean the Royal Family of King Norodom Sihanoukville, the founder of the city that was the first big urban project to open the doors of Cambodia for international trade after the French colony. The construction of the only international sea port of the Kingdom began in 1955 in a jungled area that today is the 4th Cambodian city after Phnom Penh, Battambang and Siem Reap. King Norodom Sihanouk passed away on October 15, 2012 in Beijing. This month Cambodia marks the second anniversary of the Father of the Nation that has his perpetual memory in this port city.

Phnom Penh’s AEON Mall for a dreamer city

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Aeon Mall at the river side on July 9, 2014. Photo A. Rodas.

I visited AEON Mall today in Phnom Penh. Fortunately there was not too much rain in the city, so it was possible to move in my favorite urban transport: tuk-tuk (still I have to check the urban bus.) Entering the 205 million dollars mall, I remembered October 1999 when I arrived for the first time to Phnom Penh from Bangkok and then I could made a lot comparisons between two of the Southeast Asian capitals. Phnom Penh was a dusty town full of  thieves, beggars, electricity service was limited, Internet was dominated by a single poor service company, unpaved roads, odors from a nonexistent sewage system… Then, before this huge mall between Diamond Island (Koh Pich) and Sothearos Boulevard, one friend pointed to it and said “A big mall for a poor country.” In fact it is, but I don’t share the same intention of the announcement. It is similar to the comment of one visitor to my social communication section: “But these boys don’t see coming from poverty… they have laptops!” Sure, they have, because I have been promoting that they give value to education even in the middle of their poverty to be able to break their poverty circle.  Continue reading

When water can not pass

One of the best tests for Phnom Penh and its development comes during the raining season. It is then when we discover what is not too good like flooding in different streets, many times becoming authentic rivers more than 4 meters high. Here 147 Street. You can send your own report on floodings to Urban Voices Cambodia. Photo Courtesy.

Countries with the Harshest Drug Laws in the World

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In Cambodia, you can be sentenced to many years in prison or even life in prison for possessing drugs. Unlike many other South Asian countries, Cambodia does not mandate the death penalty for drug trafficking.

In countries like Dubai, just bringing in certain prescription medication  can result in you being put in prison. In many countries, drug laws are still taken incredibly seriously and many will still sentence you to death for trafficking or dealing in them. In fact, Cambodia is one of the only South Asian countries which doesn’t execute for drug offences.

If you want to read more about the drug laws in Asian, South American and Middle Eastern countries, this guide describes which ones  still use the death penalty and which ones will hand out a lengthy prison sentence.

By Claire Harding.

Gold miner died in Battambang

Photo Courtesy Dap News.

Chea Somieng, 29, died in Battambang. Photo Courtesy Dap News.

Battambang. A miner, Chea Somieng, 29, died when the land he was digging with other 3, sank, falling several meters inside of what could be an old well in Chumka Srav Village, Barang Chalak Commune, Phnom Prik District, Battambang Province, near the border with Thailand. Somieng went to look for gold with other three miners at the yard of the house of Mr. Phiek Ieth last Saturday afternoon. According to the report of Sok Sothoat, chief of the Distrital police, the incident happened at 4:30 PM. His companions tried to take him out, but the humidity of the land made the process slow and they could recover only the body of Somieng at 11 PM. Mining is normally an unregulated activity in Cambodia performed without security measures.

Read more in Dap News.