If Inanna talks to you

 "After all the crazy night at Pub Street, I went to Eanna and I saw many Buddhist statues... so Inanna, the goddess of love, told me, clean my temple, especially of so much plastic and coca cola bottles" - Photo Inanna on the Ishtar Vase.


“After all the crazy night at Pub Street, I went to Eanna and I saw many Buddhist statues… so Inanna, the goddess of love, told me, clean my temple, especially of so much plastic and coca cola bottles” – Photo Inanna on the Ishtar Vase.

After reading about a tourist woman breaking a Buddha’s statue at the Bayon because goddess Inanna told her “to clean up the temple because there was too much rubbish, from the monks and other people” (see Daily Mail) I went to look for who was this Inanna. It could be possible that an ancient mystery of the Angkorian temples came to be revealed to a Dutch woman after a crazy night at the Pub Street? – in looking the true any hypothesis must be reviewed. Well, this Inanna is not a Khmer goddess and not even an Indian or Chinese, but Sumerian: the goddess of love, fertility and warfare. Her temple was in Eanna, an ancient city of Sumer and now located in what it is southeast Iraq, thousand of kilometers far from Siem Reap. So then, it was Willemijn Vermaat, 40, who was in the wrong place – not the Buddha’s statue. She must go to Iraq and try to break any national monument there. But I don’t think that Vermaat was the only person in the wrong place: Apsara Authority was much more in the wrong place: How is it possible that a woman breaks an archeological treasure in their nose? Where they were? Why so much daily incomes are not used to establish video cameras?

The Cambodian train: too slow for a speed world

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The Cambodian bamboo  train is an attraction, but it’s not what we expect.

The promises for a renovated Cambodian train as it was the dream during the French colonial period and after the independence, are just promises without any fulfillment. Probably ASEAN will help us in its realization, but today we still with a very slow train without a meaningful impact in the national life and its development. Probably the bamboo train in Battambang could be attractive for tourists as an aboriginal way to adapt to conditions, but it is also the proof that we really need a train.  Continue reading

Cambodia this Monsoon

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The Monsoon is actually a good time to visit Cambodia. Raining is a blessing in a country where 80% of its population lives in rural areas and depends on rice fields. Flooding is not such a disaster, though it causes its troubles, especially in provinces lie Kratie and Kompung Cham. Here some photos from ZenTrips.net, a tourist agency specialized in Spanish speaking travelers to Cambodia.

Motorcrossing for Cambodian helmets in Sihanoukville

Here is our first video on the ISeeCambodia’s campaign for helmets and safety on the national roads. The proposal is to show the situation and to move the Cambodian youth to increase their own worry to spread the message. Send your video clips’ links in Youtube and we can publish in this blog. You can entitle your video as “Motorcrossing for Cambodian helmets” and show the situation in a short video wherever you are.

The Sihanokville symbol

Tao Pi Sihanoukville July 2014 by Leito Rango

The Tao Pi Monument in July 2014. Photo by Chan Bora.

Aspect of the renovated Tao Pi Monument in Sihanoukville (Two Lions Square.) The public administration includes new lights around the roundabout, redesigned the gardens – well… practically removed the gardens and put tiles – and gave more visibility to this monument that represents Sihanoukville. They mean the Royal Family of King Norodom Sihanoukville, the founder of the city that was the first big urban project to open the doors of Cambodia for international trade after the French colony. The construction of the only international sea port of the Kingdom began in 1955 in a jungled area that today is the 4th Cambodian city after Phnom Penh, Battambang and Siem Reap. King Norodom Sihanouk passed away on October 15, 2012 in Beijing. This month Cambodia marks the second anniversary of the Father of the Nation that has his perpetual memory in this port city.

Phnom Penh’s AEON Mall for a dreamer city

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Aeon Mall at the river side on July 9, 2014. Photo A. Rodas.

I visited AEON Mall today in Phnom Penh. Fortunately there was not too much rain in the city, so it was possible to move in my favorite urban transport: tuk-tuk (still I have to check the urban bus.) Entering the 205 million dollars mall, I remembered October 1999 when I arrived for the first time to Phnom Penh from Bangkok and then I could made a lot comparisons between two of the Southeast Asian capitals. Phnom Penh was a dusty town full of  thieves, beggars, electricity service was limited, Internet was dominated by a single poor service company, unpaved roads, odors from a nonexistent sewage system… Then, before this huge mall between Diamond Island (Koh Pich) and Sothearos Boulevard, one friend pointed to it and said “A big mall for a poor country.” In fact it is, but I don’t share the same intention of the announcement. It is similar to the comment of one visitor to my social communication section: “But these boys don’t see coming from poverty… they have laptops!” Sure, they have, because I have been promoting that they give value to education even in the middle of their poverty to be able to break their poverty circle.  Continue reading

When water can not pass

One of the best tests for Phnom Penh and its development comes during the raining season. It is then when we discover what is not too good like flooding in different streets, many times becoming authentic rivers more than 4 meters high. Here 147 Street. You can send your own report on floodings to Urban Voices Cambodia. Photo Courtesy.